Dimension: global citizenship

This dimension is part of the Community Engagement in Learning priority.

Definition

  • Global citizenship means an awareness of our interconnectedness with people and environments around the globe and their contribution to a global society and economy.
  • When students develop a sense of global citizenship, they learn to respect key universal values such as peace, sustainability and upholding the rights and dignity of all people.
  • Global citizenship programs develop students' knowledge, skills, attitudes, values and competencies.
  • Effective schools draw on real life intercultural experiences which deepen students' understanding of the world and their place in it.

Essential Elements

A number of elements are essential to enable effective work within the Framework for Improving Student Outcomes. Eight Essential Elements form the foundation upon which improvement is built.

The Essential Elements for Global citizenship are:

Essential Element 1: Documented curriculum plan, assessment and shared pedagogical approaches.

Essential Element 4: Student voice, leadership and agency in own learning activated so students have positive school experiences and can act as partners in school improvement.

The Essential Elements are evident at the Evolving stage of each Continuum (below) and are further articulated in the Embedding and Excelling stages in some dimensions.

Continuum

The Continuum for Global citizenship describes a range of proficiency levels (Emerging, Evolving, Embedding and Excelling) that assists principals and teachers to identify areas of practice that require attention in order to deliver improved student outcomes.

Component: The school facilitates interconnection and globalisation

Emerging

Curriculum planning includes a focus on developing student interest in the world and understanding the ways people depend on each other. The school emphasises universal values such as respect, inclusion and acceptance.

Evolving

The school audits its curriculum to determine the extent to which global citizenship is integrated sequentially throughout the curriculum. The school practises and promotes democratic values, active citizenship and inclusion. 

Embedding

Teachers plan collaboratively to identify and integrate global perspectives into the curriculum drawing on contemporary events. The school actively engages with its local community around global issues.

Excelling

The causes and effects of globalisation are explored from a range of perspectives. The school creates opportunities for students to explore how the responsibilities of global citizenship connect with their own lives. The school initiates and students lead collaborative action with its community and /or other schools and organisations internationally to address local and global issues.

Component: The school develops intercultural capability

Emerging

Students are taught to respect diversity within the school, especially as part of special events and programs to build knowledge and understanding of different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. There are programs which focus on learning about cultural understandings and practices.

Evolving

The school celebrates diversity through actions which promote understanding, empathy and inclusion. The school creates opportunities for students to engage with the experiences of young people from different cultures and language backgrounds, including through use of technology. Teachers collaboratively design teaching and learning programs that build students’ skills to recognise barriers that may arise from differences and to develop acceptance.

Embedding

The knowledge and support of community members from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds is used to supplement and enrich the delivery of curriculum and support the teaching of the intercultural capability.  Teaching and learning connects students to the thinking and perspectives of other young people from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds so as to develop contextual understanding.

Excelling

Students have a deep understanding of intercultural capability, societal diversity and its benefits. This informs the respectful relationships they have with others. The school has formalised processes which empower students to initiate, establish and sustain local, national and international partnerships. These provide rich experiences of other cultures and languages, aligned to curricula and learning objectives. Students are critical and reflective thinkers, who examine, reflect on and challenge assumptions, stereotypes and prejudices.

Component: The school actively values conflict resolution and peace

Emerging

Teachers focus on building and maintaining positive and trusting relationships. The school supports students to develop communication, team building and leadership skills.

Evolving

Teachers model fair and just processes for responding to conflict. Teachers develop students’ skills in managing and resolving conflicts.

Embedding

Students explore ways conflict can be prevented or peacefully resolved, including advocacy, negotiation, reconciliation and mediation. Teachers design activities that develop student capacity to apply principles of conflict resolution to real-world situations.

Excelling

Students are actively involved in community activities that support social cohesion and peace building, both within and beyond the school community. As active global citizens, students take action to improve the situation and conditions of others.

Component: The school actively values social justice and human rights

Emerging

The school focuses on inclusive classrooms, encouraging interaction and communication between learners and creating a respectful and positive learning environment. Teachers develop programs and lessons to model fair and equitable treatment of all people.

Evolving

The school learning environment promotes acceptance, harmony and respect within and beyond the school community. The school develops programs to support students’ understanding of the impact of inequality and discrimination and how this affects identity and citizenship. Programs also provide indigenous perspectives and the impact of colonisation on human rights. 

Embedding

The school provides authentic opportunities for active citizenship for all students.  Teachers draw on students’ experiences to develop their understanding of the economic and social inequalities that exist globally. Students examine, reflect on and challenge abuses of social justice and human rights.

Excelling

The school provides a safe and inclusive environment that is appropriate for all forms of identity. Students are strong advocates for their own rights and the rights and dignity of others, locally and globally.

Component: The school builds sustainable futures

Emerging

The school models environmentally sustainable practices. Curriculum programs help students understand the relationship between humans, living things and the natural environment. The school encourages students to become responsible local and global citizens.  The school involves students in recycling and other sustainable practices.

Evolving

Programs identify ways in which students can meet their current needs without diminishing the quality of the environment or reducing the capacity of future generations to meet their needs. Students are actively involved in sustainability programs. The curriculum program draws on examples of living sustainably and explores how indigenous peoples in Australia and globally relate to their environments and use scarce resources to live more sustainably. 

Embedding

The school participates in a range of community sustainability initiatives that are connected to global issues. Students examine and predict the consequences of unsustainable practices. Learning opportunities enable students to explore the contribution of Australia to sustainable development in developing countries.

Excelling

Students contribute to projects with schools and communities in other countries, which improve the quality of the environment and/or promote social, political, and economic sustainability. Students monitor and evaluate the school’s recycling and other sustainable practices.

Printable resources

Continuum as an A3 print out (pdf - 227.7kb)

Case studies

To see examples of how schools in Victoria are implementing the FISO dimension: Global citizenship see Global citizenship case studies.

Evidence base

To view the Evidence Base for the FISO dimension: Global citizenship see Evidence - Global citizenship (docx - 647.33kb).

FAQs

Why should my school engage with this dimension?

  • Interaction with other nationalities and cultures can help give students a stronger outward perspective. Carefully designed programs that increase interaction between students of different nationalities can help improve intercultural attitudes.
  • Research shows that intergroup contact typically reduces prejudice and that positive interracial contact between school-aged young people can encourage positive interracial attitudes.
  • Carefully designed E-contact programs can successfully promote intergroup harmony in both the short-term and long-term.
  • A report documenting the benefits of sister school relationships in Victoria found that such programs can have positive effects on student global awareness, attitudes and responses. These benefits are of greatest significance once relationships are well established and embedded within the school.
     

To what extent is this dimension being implemented in my school?

Consider whether your students are globally engaged. What programs establish and sustain international partnerships that provide students with a deep understanding of the world and rich experiences of other cultures, aligned to curricula and learning objectives?

What can my school focus on?

  • Audit curriculum programs to determine the extent to which teaching aspects of  global citizenship are integrated throughout the curriculum.
  • Draw on local and international examples of effective practice to embed a culture of inclusion based on a deep understanding of intercultural capability, societal diversity and its benefits.
     

What does successful implementation look like?

  • Program and lesson design integrate international perspectives, and development of students' self-identity and responsibilities as global citizens.
  • Programs develop student capacity to apply principles of conflict resolution to real-world situations.
  • The school supports students to lead and contribute to projects, including those with schools in other countries, which improve the quality of the environment and/or promote sustainability.

What strategies and actions can my school implement?

  • Establish and sustain international (sister school) partnerships that provide students with rich experience of other cultures, aligned to curricula.
  • Provide authentic opportunities for active citizenship for all students.
  • Enable students to become involved in community activities that support social cohesion and peace building, both within and beyond the school community.
  • Involve students in community sustainability initiatives that are connected to global issues.

More information

For more information, see Community Engagement in Learning priority.