Nationally Consistent Collection of Data

From Term 1 2017, Victorian government and Catholic schools will use the new Victorian Curriculum F-10. Curriculum related information is currently being reviewed and may be subject to change.

For more information on the curriculum, see:
The Victorian Curriculum F–10 - VCAA

​School Students with Disability

Frequently Asked Questions for Parents/Carers

1. What is the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability?

The Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability (NCCD) is an annual count of the number of students with disability receiving educational adjustments to support their participation in education on the same basis as students without disability.

2. Why has the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability been introduced?

There is currently no accurate national data set around students with disability and consequently no reporting on the number of students with disability.

Each state and territory currently identifies its students with disability on a different basis.

Comprehensive data is necessary to enable governments to target support and resources in schools to help students with disabilities reach their potential. In order to achieve this, the Australian government and all state and territory governments agreed to collect data annually about students with disability in a nationally consistent way.

The collection will also assist schools to formally and consistently recognise the support and adjustments they provide to students with disability, to develop teacher judgements in making adjustments for students with disability rather than relying on a medical/clinical diagnosis alone and to evaluate their learning and support systems and processes to make quality teaching for all students their core focus.

3. Isn’t data on school students with disability collected now?

Jurisdictions and sectors do collect data but they currently identify students with a disability using different definitions and on different bases.

This collection will, for the first time, provide information on how many school students with disability there are, where they are located and the level of reasonable adjustments provided for them.

4. What information will be collected through the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability

The following information will be collected:

• a student’s level of education (i.e. primary or secondary)

• a student’s level of adjustment; and

• a student’s broad type of disability.

5. How will this data be used?

The purpose of the collection is to provide the Commonwealth and State governments and all schools with a better understanding of their student populations and how students with disability are supported.

The data collected by schools will:

• inform future policy and program planning in relation to students with disability

• ensure necessary supports are in place for principals, teachers and other school staff to assist students with a range of complex needs, and their families.

The Education Council, council of education ministers, has also indicated that it believes the collection can inform future funding arrangements.

6. What is a reasonable adjustment?

A reasonable adjustment is a measure or action taken to help a student with disability participate in education on the same basis as other students.

Adjustments can be made across the whole school setting (such as ramps into buildings), in the classroom (such as adapting class lessons) and at an individual student level (such as extra tuition for a student with learning difficulties).

Schools are required to make reasonable adjustments for students with disability under the Disability Standards for Education 2005.

7. What are the benefits of the national data collection for my child?

The aim of the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability is to have better information about Australian school students with disability.

The information provided through the data collection will enable all Australian governments to better target support and resources to benefit students with disability. It will help to put the right supports in place for students with disability so that they have the same opportunities for a high quality education as students without disability.

The national data collection is also an opportunity for schools to evaluate their learning and support systems and processes and make quality teaching for all students their core focus.

8. Will my child’s privacy be pro​tected?

All data is de-identified prior to its transfer to the Australian Government Department of Education and Training and treated as confidential. All information is provided in aggregated figures. No personal or identifying data will be supplied to the Australian Government Department of Education and Training.

9. Where can I get further information about the Disability Standards for Education and what it means for me and my child?

A website has been developed to provide a practical guide for individuals, families and communities in understanding the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the Disability Standards for Education 2005.

The website is publicly available​ and free: resource.dse.theeducationinstitute.edu.au/

10. Where can I get more information on the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Studen​ts with Disability?

In the first instance, you should contact your child’s school principal to discuss any questions or concerns you may have.

Additional information about the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability is available via the Victorian Department of Education and Training Phone Hotline on (03) 9097 1049 and the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data Page