Identification and assessment of learning difficulties

Assessments can help you understand how a student can reach their potential and where they need help.

Identifying the aspects of a student’s reading difficulty

A reading difficulty may be indicated when there is a discrepancy between a student’s actual reading ability and what might be expected of their age-cohort peers. For example, when a student’s achievement level in the Victorian Curriculum is more than one year below their peers.

Students are also seen as having a reading difficulty when causal features cannot be explained by the following factors:

  • visual or auditory perceptual difficulties
  • emotional adjustment problems
  • severe attention issues
  • behavioural difficulties
  • neurological disorders such as acquired brain injury
  • autism
  • childhood schizophrenia
  • physical or motor problems
  • ongoing ill health
  • school attendance.

These assessment tasks are aligned to aspects of literacy theory that are typically related to reading difficulties. They can help you identify specific aspects of a student’s reading difficulty:

These tasks can be used in addition to other tools and resources.

Assessment for numeracy difficulties

A numeracy difficulty may be indicated when there is a discrepancy between a student’s performance against the curriculum and what might be expected of their age-cohort peers. For example, when a student’s achievement level in the Victorian Curriculum is more than one year below their peers.

Resources are available to help you assess numeracy skills and achievement.