Secondary Years 7-10 - Speaking and Listening Stage S4

Indicators of progress – Stage S4: Texts and responses to texts

At the end of Stage S4, students can routinely use spoken English to do the following things:

Receptive

  • demonstrate essential understanding of a wide range of mainstream spoken texts
  • extract some key information or ideas from a variety of audiovisual materials in use in mainstream classes across the curriculum using guide questions
  • obtain the gist of an unfamiliar speaker where relevant background knowledge has been provided beforehand

Productive

  • negotiate with peers and teachers when planning work and exchanging information
  • justify a point of view with mainstream peers with increasing independence, e.g. by rebutting, or clarifying, ‘No, I mean we should keep the forests to slow down the global warming’
  • present an extended talk organised to reflect a clear progression of ideas and information and respond appropriately to audience reaction
  • present complex ideas and information in a sustained, organised way.

Indicators of progress – Stage S4: Cultural conventions of language use

At the end of Stage S4, students’ understanding of the contexts and purposes of spoken texts is shown when they:

Receptive

  • identify simple examples of bias in speech, e.g. through emotive expressions, such as ‘It’s rubbish to say ...’
  • identify the overall intention of an accessible but unfamiliar speaker, e.g. identify whether the speaker was for, or against, a particular issue

Productive

  • take account of purpose and context
  • move with ease between formal and informal register in response to purpose and context
  • express and qualify opinions, e.g. using expressions such as I disagree, I think that …, in my view etc.; through modality: may, might, in some cases etc.; and through conditional expressions: but what if ...? why would …?
  • use intonation, volume and stress to emphasise an opinion or emotion, e.g. ‘that is NOT what happened’.

Indicators of progress – Stage S4: Linguistic structures and features

At the end of Stage S4, students’ understanding of the linguistic structures and features of spoken English is shown when they:

Receptive

  • show an understanding of texts which use complex grammatical features, e.g. infinitive, gerund, conditional, passive voice, reported speech, relative clauses and question tags
  • show an understanding of how the use of modality can affect a speaker's intended meaning

Productive

  • show sufficient control of basic structures and features of spoken English to participate effectively in a supportive mainstream classroom
  • identify aspects of their pronunciation that impede communication and focus on correction of them with teacher support, e.g. the articulation of final consonants, a specific vowel sound or inappropriate word stress
  • extend speech, using generally appropriate connectives and signal words, e.g. unless, in that case, however, this/that shows …
  • plan and deliver an extended talk following an organised structure appropriate to its purpose and audience
  • qualify opinions through modality, e.g. ‘may’, ‘might’, ‘in some cases’, etc. and through conditional expressions, e.g. ‘but what if ...?’, ‘Why would …?’
  • use the language of prediction and hypothesis in a group problem-solving task, e.g. ‘If we use this one then ...’, ‘That won’t work because of the ...’.

Indicators of progress – Stage S4: Maintaining and negotiating communication

At the end of Stage S4, students may use the following strategies to maintain and negotiate spoken communication:

Receptive

  • take notes from a range of texts from across the curriculum, e.g. guest speaker’s talk, video, audio tape
  • ask teacher or fellow student for clarification to check understanding, e.g. does that mean …?

Productive

  • develop speaking and listening strategies to participate effectively in a supportive mainstream class
  • identify problems in pronunciation specific to themselves which need attention, e.g. ‘I can’t tell the difference between walk and work.’
  • discuss a point of language, e.g. ‘Why is it the car door and not the car’s door?’
  • revise plans for a formal extended talk in response to feedback.