Secondary Years 7-10 - Speaking and Listening Stage S3

Indicators of progress – Stage S3: Texts and responses to texts

At the end of Stage S3, students can routinely use spoken English to do the following things:

Receptive

  • demonstrate some understanding of a limited range of familiar mainstream spoken texts and, in supportive classroom situations, express the gist of ideas and opinions
  • listen to/view audiovisual resources for specific information when questions are given beforehand and appropriate background information is provided
  • obtain the gist of spoken text on a familiar mainstream topic spoken at close to normal speed but with support, e.g. where a teacher explains concepts or key terms on the board

Productive

  • engage in structured negotiations with peers and teachers, planning a project, exchanging information in familiar informal and formal classroom situations
  • use available repertoire of English to discuss and justify a point of view on a familiar topic
  • deliver an extended class talk (at least 5 minutes) responding to follow-up questions, after support and modelling.

Indicators of progress – Stage S3: Cultural conventions of language use

At the end of Stage S3, students’ understanding of the contexts and purposes of spoken texts is shown when they:

Receptive

  • take account of non-verbal language, e.g. when giving a formal talk consciously establish eye contact with audience rather than referring to notes or prompts
  • show an awareness of the interest and past experience of the audience when selecting content and the appropriate level of detail for a class talk

Productive

  • adapt speech in common classroom interactions appropriate to the particular context and audience
  • use some appropriate language of discussion, e.g. give suggestions and opinions; ask for clarification; use an increasing range of expressions, e.g. in my view, I think …
  • present a short formal talk demonstrating awareness of the need for an introduction and a conclusion
  • incorporate descriptive detail through the use of modifiers, e.g. adverbs, adjectives, levels of possibility, in spontaneous interactions
  • use idiomatic and colloquial language appropriately.

Indicators of progress – Stage S3: Linguistic structures and features

At the end of Stage S3, students’ understanding of the linguistic structures and features of spoken English is shown when they:

Receptive

  • interpret the gist of accessible spoken and audiovisual texts, and, with support, understand the full text
  • listen for specific information when questions are given beforehand
  • understand the gist of small amounts of abstract and generalised information when appropriate background is provided

Productive

  • manipulate available spoken English repertoire to communicate in extended but predictable situations suitable to a mainstream context
  • use time signals to link extended speech, e.g. Before we started the experiment we ..., At the end of this talk I’ll …
  • use a range of connectives, e.g. ‘because’, ‘without’, ‘but’, to extend speech rather than start another sentence
  • demonstrate sufficient control of stress rhythm and intonation to be understood in most situations
  • use some conditional forms, e.g. if it is ok with you, I would like to try
  • begin to experiment with tag questions, e.g. We do this now, don’t we?

Indicators of progress – Stage S3: Maintaining and negotiating communication

At the end of Stage S3, students may use the following strategies to maintain and negotiate spoken communication:

Receptive

  • ask questions to clarify understanding, e.g. ‘Do you mean that …?’
  • collaborate with the teacher to form strategies for improving listening comprehension and speech performance
  • take on an assigned role in small group work, e.g. recorder, facilitator
  • take notes from a text selected by the teacher, e.g. video recording

Productive

  • maintain eye contact with the audience when giving a talk
  • refer to strategic written prompts
  • use predicting and previewing strategies to support listening comprehension, e.g. by brainstorming alone or with peers for possible key words, by predicting what someone may say next, based on what the conversation has been about so far.