Secondary Years 7-10 - Speaking and Listening Stage S2

Indicators of progress – Stage S2: Texts and responses to texts

At the end of Stage S2, students can routinely use spoken English to do the following things:

Receptive

  • extract specific information from short spoken or visual texts, using guide questions from the teacher
  • comprehend the gist of a range of simple instructions, descriptions, explanations
  • interact in English with peers in pair or group work activities in familiar contexts
  • follow a short sequence of instructions related to classroom activities, e.g. ‘Divide your page into two columns. Label the columns A and B. Then number the rows 1 to 20’ etc.

Productive

  • give information or assistance when requested, e.g. ‘The office is down there.’
  • express simple opinions, describe feelings, e.g. ‘I feel sorry for him because …’
  • use descriptive language to describe an object, place or idea, e.g. ‘It’s got brown fur, is big and has long claws.’
  • give a short impromptu response on a familiar topic
  • present a short prepared formal talk (at least 3 minutes), supported by notes and props (e.g. a photo etc.) on a researched topic, with heavy word-for-word reliance on their written text responding to straight forward follow up questions
  • transfer language structures and functions from personal contexts to subject-based contexts eg ‘Both Hien and Nam are from Vietnam’, ‘Both the Arctic and the Antarctic are polar zones’
  • recount the steps in a problem solving activity with teacher support
  • give a short sequence of instructions related to classroom activities
  • communicate intended meaning on simple familiar topics without the listener needing to seek clarification
  • attempt to express complex thoughts and feelings in English, but rely on attentive conversation partner who asks for clarification paraphrasing etc. to do so successfully
  • take part in role-plays of familiar settings with one part given, and the other part devised by students
  • initiate a change in topic within a conversation, e.g. ‘By the way …’.

Indicators of progress – Stage S2: Cultural conventions of language use

At the end of Stage S2, students’ understanding of the contexts and purposes of spoken texts is shown when they:

Receptive

  • use simple, modelled language appropriately in familiar contexts to give instructions, describe, explain
  • show an awareness of formal/informal register/colloquial language, e.g. See you later Miss.
  • interact appropriately and with some degree of confidence with the wider community, e.g. using public transport, discussing course selection with teachers from mainstream schools, asking questions during excursions
  • are familiar with a limited range of frequently occurring colloquialisms, but colloquial speech and utterances with many cultural references will seriously impede comprehension
  • recognise emotive uses of interpersonal language on a familiar topic related to needs, interest or background and in a familiar social situation, e.g. in anger or annoyance, using stressed vocatives and descending intonation in tag endings

Productive

  • contribute to a group problem solving task, reaching a joint logical conclusion
  • demonstrate the use of intonation to affect the intended message of an utterance
  • talk about cultural differences related to communication such as stance, hand gesture, head movements, eye contact
  • talk about the appropriateness of forms of politeness in different contexts
  • have very tentative use of polite request forms, e.g. would, could, and some ability to vary the modality of utterances appropriately, e.g. can/could.

Indicators of progress – Stage S2: Linguistic structures and features

At the end of Stage S2, students’ understanding of the linguistic structures and features of spoken English is shown when they:

Receptive

  • distinguish, with guidance, different intonation patterns, e.g. for questions, statements, lists etc.
  • understand the meanings conveyed by different pronouns and conjunctions
  • extrapolate word stress, rhythm and intonation patterns from familiar topics or contexts to deal with unfamiliar material

Productive

  • usually use appropriate pronouns and an increasing range of coordinating (and, but, or) and subordinating conjunctions (after, because, before, if, while), to link ideas, e.g. ‘She waited for Alex at the station but he didn’t come.’
  • are increasingly aware of the appropriate use of pauses to make extended utterances more intelligible
  • sometimes use stress to emphasise key words in sentences, e.g. Birds don’t have fur they have feathers
  • pronounce the basic elements of the English sound system well enough to be understood
  • carry out short, spoken interactions in subject-based activities using a variety of text types
  • use standard and non-standard forms such as ‘I can’t play soccer’ ‘Do you know where is it?’
  • appropriately use a wide range of question forms, e.g. Could you tell me …? What was she doing …? How long was the river …?
  • use adverbial phrases, pronouns and irregular past tenses with some accuracy
  • use a small range of vocabulary to convey shades of meaning, e.g. good, fine, terrific, wonderful, excellent
  • use compound and complex sentences with some success.

Indicators of progress – Stage S2: Maintaining and negotiating communication

At the end of Stage S2, students may use the following strategies to maintain and negotiate spoken communication:

Receptive

  • deduce the meaning of some unknown words from context cues
  • repeat sentences, modelling aspects of the rhythm, intonation and pronunciation of the other speaker
  • often show remarkable ability and ease of understanding, but under excitement or pressure may lose comprehension
  • be less dependent on a supportive conversation partner and have little need to ask for repetition or reformulation, especially if the topic is familiar
  • take notes when listening to simple texts following structure provided by the teacher

Productive

  • initiate and maintain exchanges, e.g. using simple conversational openers, turn taking, leave taking
  • make direct appeals for assistance, e.g. ‘How to say this in English?’
  • make some extended utterances by experimenting with known features or vocabulary to express new meanings
  • use eye contact appropriately in a short classroom talk
  • create new vocabulary from known words, e.g. invite –  invitation
  • use pauses and fillers (ah, um) appropriately to allow ordering of thought.