Middle/Upper Primary Years 3-6 - Speaking and Listening Stage BL

Indicators of progress – Stage BL: texts and responses to texts

At the end of Stage BL, students can routinely use spoken English to do the following things:

Receptive

  • identify basic items of information from short spoken texts, e.g. known vocabulary (identifying animal names, colours), time markers
  • attend to tone, intonation and context when listening, e.g. differentiating between questions, instructions and statements
  • follow simple instructions and understand simple, predictable questions
  • respond appropriately verbally or non verbally when spoken to, e.g. indicate agreement/non-agreement

Productive

  • make simple requests/express needs using actions, single words and short phrases, e.g. go toilet? This my pencil? Drink?
  • give some basic information about self using short formulaic or single word responses, e.g. name, age, family details, likes/dislikes
  • use intonation to enhance the meaning of simple utterances, e.g. my pen?/my pen!/my pen
  • negotiate familiar social situations and learning activities with the teacher or with friends, by initiating, suggesting, agreeing, disagreeing, requesting assistance
  • enhance own spoken texts with appropriate gestures and facial expression
  • when talking about pictures, identify basic items of information, e.g. known vocabulary (names of people or animals in the picture, single words for how they are feeling, colours, sizes).

Indicators of progress – Stage BL: cultural conventions of language use

At the end of Stage BL, students’ understanding of the contexts and purposes of spoken texts is shown when they:

Receptive

  • follow simple instructions by relying on key words and immediate context, e.g. line up, stand up, sit down
  • respond to context and intonation, e.g. know when a conversation is serious or humorous
  • know when it is appropriate to speak or to listen during class interactions
  • begin to recognise word patterns/rhyming words

Productive

  • initiate social interactions and use appropriate social expressions, e.g. please, thank you, may I play?
  • use acceptable social formulas, e.g. know that some words, gestures or intonation are inappropriate in certain contexts
  • interact appropriately in context, e.g. continue an interaction in the same manner as begun by the other speaker
  • use intonation appropriately to assist meaning.

Indicators of progress – Stage BL: linguistic structures and features

At the end of Stage BL, students’ understanding of the linguistic structures and features of spoken English is shown when they:

Receptive

  • distinguish spoken English from other languages, e.g. on hearing English, attempt to respond using basic English
  • understand simple past, present and future tense in context, e.g. ‘yesterday we went’, ‘now we can eat lunch’, ‘tomorrow we will go’
  • respond to key words in a range of common spoken instructions, e.g. Shut the door.

Productive

  • construct two or three word utterances with the support of actions, gestures or visuals, e.g. ‘shut door’
  • express needs using learned word patterns, e.g. ‘go toilet’, ‘me eat’, ‘me drink’
  • create original expressions, substituting new words in learned patterns or formulas, e.g. 'It's time to go football.' 'It's time go eat.'
  • use comprehensible pronunciation
  • use a range of formulas for appropriate purposes, e.g. What’s the time? Oh, no! Very good! Excellent work
  • use common adjectives, e.g. beautiful, sad, happy, angry
  • use common adverbs, e.g. slowly, very, yesterday
  • express negation through use of no, not, e.g. No hot today, Not me.

Indicators of progress – Stage BL: maintaining and negotiating communication

At the end of Stage BL, students may use the following strategies to maintain and negotiate spoken communication:

Receptive

  • demonstrate active listening, attending to tone, intonation and visual stimuli
  • tune in to particular sounds of English and to English intonation, e.g. recognise rhyming words (play, stay) and emotions expressed through intonation (happy, angry)
  • ask for repetition, or question to check meaning, to clarify, to confirm or to elicit help
  • use non-verbal language to sustain interaction with others, e.g. nod, smile, laugh, gesture
  • check understanding of classroom English, e.g. ask for clarification from other first language speakers or by watching what others do

Productive

  • repeat or re-pronounce words or phrases after recognising they have not been understood
  • imitate pronunciation, stress, intonation or familiar repetitive patterns, e.g. stories, songs, rhymes, the media
  • borrow key words from previous speaker, e.g. T: ‘Don’t be silly Tim’, S: ‘Tim silly’
  • memorise new words and phrases
  • rely on other speakers to scaffold the conversation, to interpret, to clarify or to elaborate.