Middle/Upper Primary Years 3-6 - Speaking and Listening Stage B2

Indicators of progress – Stage B2: texts and responses to texts

At the end of Stage B2, students can routinely use spoken English to do the following things:

Receptive

  • follow a short sequence of instructions related to classroom procedures or learning activities, e.g. rules for using class computer, locating places on a map
  • identify key points of information from short spoken texts
  • follow teacher explanations that use familiar English, and follow simple recounts of shared activities
  • follow classroom task-related instructions with clear steps and modelling of the task
  • order information using pictures
  • understand social English in most familiar contexts, but still need additional help from conversation partner, e.g. gestures, modified speech, provision of wait-time

Productive

  • participate in short, structured social interactions with increasing grammatical accuracy, e.g. by introducing self and others
  • express simple opinions, humour and describe feelings
  • identify true or false information from spoken texts
  • negotiate simple transactions, e.g. borrowing a library book, asking for directions or assistance
  • describe a series of events or actions using some detail, e.g. time, context
  • describe and identify people, places and things using simple vocabulary for colour, size, place, location, time
  • answer subject-specific questions using a familiar structure on a familiar topic, e.g. T: Which shape has three sides? S: A triangle
  • interact socially with peers and familiar adults in most informal school contexts
  • participate in academic learning activities on familiar topics if teacher and contextual support (modelling, scaffolding, recycling of language etc.) and time are provided, e.g. can describe processes such as The Water Cycle in simple terms.

Indicators of progress – Stage B2: cultural conventions of language use

At the end of Stage B2, students’ understanding of the contexts and purposes of spoken texts is shown when they:

Receptive

  • identify and use some terminology of a number of spoken text types and forms, e.g. stories, poems, recipes
  • understand that intonation, volume or stress are used with different effects in different situations, e.g. shouting a warning, talking softly in group/play activities

Productive

  • respond appropriately for the context, e.g. listen and respond to other students during a class discussion
  • participate appropriately in social and learning situations, e.g. through conversational formulas, turn-taking, affirming, suggesting, discussing.

Indicators of progress – Stage B2: linguistic structures and features

At the end of Stage B2, students’ understanding of the linguistic structures and features of spoken English is shown when they:

Receptive

  • understand adverbial phrases of place, location, time, e.g. over there
  • understand and use some common contractions, e.g. I’m, you’re, we’ll, we won’t

Productive

  • use negative form, e.g. I don’t go
  • use common prepositions, e.g. in, at, on, near
  • use some grammatical rules consistently, e.g. may overgeneralise in formation of plurals: mouses, sheeps
  • use correctly some forms of the verbs to be, to have, and verb endings with some consistency, e.g. –ing, -ed
  • use some articles correctly, e.g. a dog/the dog
  • use some non-contracted forms, e.g. for stress, I am not!
  • use specific time markers in speech, e.g. yesterday, last week, on the weekend, but may not also mark the verbs for tense, e.g. first is good, after is boy want fight
  • pronounce familiar words comprehensibly
  • begin to produce more complex language, e.g. using subordinating conjunctions such as because, when, that
  • show signs of early modality, e.g. if …, could, might, will, must, perhaps.

Indicators of progress – Stage B2: maintaining and negotiating communication

At the end of Stage B2, students may use the following strategies to maintain and negotiate spoken communication:

Receptive

  • predict meaning from context
  • ask for the translation of specific words from other first language speakers, e.g. to check context, match concepts

Productive

  • ask speaker to repeat or speak slowly, or ask what a word means, e.g. What you mean? What mean ‘festival’? What ostrich?
  • initiate and maintain common social exchanges, e.g. by using simple conversation openers, turn-taking, leave-taking
  • repeat another speaker’s words in subsequent conversation, e.g. Where did you plant the seeds? Plant the seeds in pot.
  • use a repertoire of common classroom and playground language, e.g. Wait a minute. Be quiet please. My turn.
  • practise pronunciation and phrasing
  • repeat a word, phrase or sentence, modelling rhythm, intonation and pronunciation on the speech of others
  • use vocabulary and structures learned from written texts in speech.