Lower Primary Years P-2 - Writing Stage A1

Indicators of progress – Stage A1: texts and responses to texts

At the end of Stage A1, students can routinely write the following kinds of texts and respond in the following ways to texts they have read or heard:

  • write a simple text that fulfils a function, e.g. simple description, recount, procedure
  • draw to illustrate a simple text, e.g. to relate an ongoing activity, to give additional information, to retell a simple story
  • contribute ideas, words or sentences to a class or group shared story
  • write well-known symbols, words, phrases or short texts, e.g. Today is Monday
  • complete simple repetitive modelled sentences, e.g. I like …; I went to …; Today is …
  • reread their own texts, or sentences scribed by another
  • choose a topic to write or draw about
  • write or complete simple sentences from own experience
  • write a caption or label for an illustration.

Indicators of progress – Stage A1: cultural conventions of language use

At the end of Stage A1, students’ understanding of the contexts and purposes of texts they write is shown when they:

  • show awareness that English writing consists of words formed by letters, and sentences made up of words, e.g. leave spaces between groups of letters or between words
  • use some conventions for printed English, e.g. left to right, top to bottom, copied letters are identifiable
  • respond to the terms writing and drawing appropriately
  • understand some terminology of writing, e.g. word, letter, sentence, space, full stop
  • expect words to have consistent spellings, e.g. copy words carefully, ask how to spell a word, or ask for a word to be written so they can copy it
  • show evidence of layout or planning in writing, e.g. place text appropriately on a page, leave space for a drawing
  • take particular care with handwriting, drawing, or choosing materials when writing for special purposes, e.g. ‘publishing’ a story, making a birthday card
  • use appropriate size, spacing and letter formation.

Indicators of progress – Stage A1: linguistic structures and features

At the end of Stage A1, students’ understanding of the linguistic structures and features of the texts they write is shown when they:

  • write sentences or phrases that reflect their oral structures, e.g. go to school, go home, come from
  • dictate sentences or phrases that reflect their oral structures, e.g. go to school, go home, come from
  • label drawings of everyday personal activities using language learnt in the classroom, e.g. live here, play, study
  • write ‘run-on sentences’, e.g. at school we work and at school we play
  • dictate ‘run-on sentences’, e.g. at school we work and at school we play …
  • demonstrate awareness of some sound-letter relationships, e.g. represent words by initial letter, or several letters, such as 'bk' for book
  • write some words using correct spelling
  • spell with accuracy some CVC words (consonant-vowel-consonant) and common words learned in the classroom
  • consistently write the same letters and numbers the same way
  • understand the difference between upper and lower case letters
  • begin to include/experiment with some familiar punctuation, e.g. full stops, capital letters.

Indicators of progress – Stage A1: maintaining and negotiating communication

At the end of Stage A1, students may use the following strategies to assist them to write texts:

  • use illustrations to provide more detail to a written text
  • use illustrations as a prompt for a scribe to write for them
  • use words copied from various sources, e.g. labels, signs, word lists
  • use invented spelling which draws heavily on phonetic strategies or based on own pronunciation
  • dictate sentences about a drawing or an experience for others to write
  • write the same very simple texts repeatedly
  • practise correct formation of letters
  • ask for a word to be written so it can be copied
  • copy words, phrases or sentences accurately
  • use basic keyboard skills to write personally significant words and simple modelled sentences, e.g. own name, ‘I went to the park'
  • begin to experiment and attach meaning to their writing.