Koorie Cross-Curricular Protocols for Victorian Government Schools

From Term 1 2017, Victorian government and Catholic schools will use the new Victorian Curriculum F-10. Curriculum related information is currently being reviewed and may be subject to change.

For more information on the curriculum, see:
The Victorian Curriculum F–10 - VCAA

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Protocols and principles for working with Victorian Koorie communities 

Aboriginal people whose traditional lands and waters exist within the boundaries that today frame the state of Victoria are often collectively called Koorie peoples or Koories. Koorie is a contemporary collective or group term. Throughout this document, the term ‘Koorie’ is used inclusively and refers to both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Victoria.

Introduction

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture has existed in this land for around 50,000 years. The uniqueness of these cultures and the wisdom and knowledge embedded in them, are things to be highly valued by all Australians. To this end, these protocols seek a way to protect the integrity of these cultural expressions and a way in which all Australians can engage respectfully and feel connected to this identity.

Principles

  1. Koorie and all Aboriginal people are entitled to respect for their culture.
  2. Exposure to, and engagement with, Koorie and other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage will enrich all Australians and strengthen our unique identity.
  3. Koorie and other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage, including cultural expression, is the intellectual property of Koorie and other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Cultural expression includes stories, poetry, songs, instrumental music, dances, plays, ceremonies, rituals, performances, symbols, drawings, designs, paintings, body paintings, carvings, sculptures, handicrafts, baskets, needlework, textiles, artefacts and instruments.
  4. Koorie people are entitled to protect and manage the use of their cultural heritage and expression.
  5. Koorie people are entitled to benefit from any activities that use their cultural heritage and expression.
  6. Koorie people are entitled to government support in the protection and maintenance of their cultural heritage and expression. 

Guidelines

  1. The first step in the development of any school activity involving students’ active development of, or production of a replica of, a Koorie cultural expression must be consultation with the Traditional Owners or Custodians of the land on which the school stands, as described in Using Koorie cultural expression in the classroom.
  2. The Traditional Owners or Custodians remain the owners of the Indigenous cultural and intellectual property (ICIP) rights used in the activity, and should be acknowledged as such in any published materials relating to the activity.
  3. The activity must not damage Koorie, and more broadly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, cultural integrity.
 

Using Koorie cultural expressions in the classroom

Meaningful learning about Koorie and other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, traditions, histories and experiences is enhanced by consultation with Koorie and other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities. No amount of study can substitute for the lived experiences of members of these Communities.

Coranderrk play classroom example

There are some credible resources in the public domain that can be used for activities such as viewing or reading without consultation with the appropriate Koorie or Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Community. If resources for these receptive activities are selected from a reputable website, they should provide appropriate material for delivering specific curriculum content.

For examples, see: Museum Victoria and Creative Victoria

If a task or unit will require students to actively develop or produce a replica of a Koorie, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander cultural expression, consultation with the Koorie, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Community that owns the cultural expression is required.

If you are unsure about the need to consult or are seeking advice on appropriate local Koorie Community organisations, contact your local Koorie Education Coordinator or Victorian Aboriginal Education Association Inc (VAEAI)

Working with Koorie communities

Before initiating a consultative process, you should familiarise yourself with the principles and guidelines for working with Koorie Communities.

The following resources provide further information relating to working with Koorie and other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities:

Indigenous cultural and intellectual property

Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property (ICIP) rights must be respected. ICIP can cover many different forms of traditional culture and expression. Some of these are:

  • Writing, e.g. a book, poetry
  • Music, e.g. a song
  • Performances, e.g. dance, ceremonies
  • Artistic work, e.g. painting
  • Languages
  • Tangible cultural property, e.g. sacred sites, burial grounds
  • Intangible cultural property, e.g. stories passed on orally
  • Documentation of Indigenous peoples’ heritage in all forms of media, e.g. reports, films, sound recordings. (Source: Artists in Black, Arts Law Information Sheet).

For more organisations, see: Indigenous cultural and intellectual property (docx 313kb)

Preparations for the activity

Koorie kids hand paintingTeachers and students need to understand the subtleties of Koorie relationships and communication styles and be prepared to be flexible when consulting and/or working with Koorie Communities.

In Victoria, it is appropriate that the content of the activities proposed should follow a Koorie community-preferred education model which focuses at the local level first (local Koorie perspectives), then extends to neighbouring regional Communities, followed by other Victorian Koorie Communities, and, finally, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities from across Australia. For example:

  • Koorie art in the community on which the school stands
  • Koorie art from neighbouring communities
  • Koorie art from other Victorian communities
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art from across Australia.

When bringing in guest speakers who are Koorie Community members, the teacher must consult with the Community member in relation to what will and will not be discussed during their visit, particularly in relation to sensitive issues. The teacher should also advise the Community member of the students’ age, likely questions, and any other information relevant to the activity.

For more information, see: Potentially sensitive issues (docx 314kb)

Advice on cross-cultural communication

For further information on consulting effectively with Koorie and other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Community members, see: Advice on cross-cultural communication (docx - 53.59kb) (Source: Drama Australia)