Years 9 - 12

Who am I online? Who are my friends online?

Focus: What’s real online?
Objective: To strengthen students’ understanding of strategies they can use to keep themselves safe online and offline when using digital technologies

Teaching ideas

Teaching idea 1: Jeremy’s friend

View the Wise Up To It video: Jeremy’s Friend and complete accompanying lesson plan. See: Jeremy's Friend

‘School sucks, no one understands you and your parents don’t seem to care.

Meet Jeremy. He’s having a hard time at school, his parents are always nagging him about something and life is pretty miserable. But he can escape it all in cyberspace. He’s a great gamer with friends all over the world who understand him and all the crap going on in his life.

And then one day, he decides to meet one of his online friends. This clip tells the truth about Jeremy’s friend.’

Teaching idea 2: Protecting your digital reputation

Revise how to protect your digital reputation. Review strategies presented at: 

Note: These articles were included for Level 5 but could be a useful basis for discussion as a lead in to Activities 3 and 4.

Teaching idea 3: Newspaper articles

College officials poking around on Facebook (from The Baltimore Sun, 2009, by Childs Walker) and Networking for work (from The Sydney Morning Herald, 2010, by Joshua Jennings).

Discussion prompts

  1. What is it that makes Facebook and MySpace so appealing?
  2. Given that universities and businesses might run a check on applicants, how might that impact on your postings?
  3. Should universities and employment agents have the right to apply checks on applicants’ Facebook and social networking sites?
  4. Is Facebook just another temporary fad?
  5. In your opinion, how else might we see Facebook used in the future?
  6. How could you use a social networking site like Facebook to promote potential career opportunities in the future?
 

Protecting my online privacy

Focus: What’s real online?
Objective: To strengthen students’ understanding of the need to protect their privacy online and how to maintain this privacy, and awareness of appropriate action to be taken if their online privacy is threatened.

Teaching ideas

Teaching idea 1: Lauren’s ordeal

View the Wise Up To It video: Lauren’s Ordeal 

Complete the accompanying lesson plan.

'Lauren goes to school one day and everything has changed. Her friends won’t talk to her, people laugh and point when she walks past and someone has sent her disturbing text messages. She keeps receiving vicious emails from people she doesn’t even know, people have posted lies and rumours about her on the internet and when she logs into Messenger, she has been blocked by all her friends.

Lauren is being bullied in cyberspace as a result of giving her password to a friend. This clip is Lauren’s story—what happened and how she dealt with it.'

Teaching idea 2: What the?

View the Wise Up To IT video: What the? Complete the accompanying lesson plan.

'Does this sound familiar? Your computer takes ages to load programs and open files. You’re constantly bombarded with pop-ups. Your internet settings have changed and you don’t know why. Strange things are happening to your email and online accounts. It could be one or it could be all, but if you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, its possible that your computer has spyware—malicious software that is installed onto your computer to spy on your every move.

This guy had these problems and more…watch the clip to find out how downloading material caused his problems and what he did to protect himself and his computer.'

Teaching idea 3: (Year 9) Privacy and e-security – budd:e

View the video clip on 'Privacy' from the 'Toob' section of budd:e (E-security Education Package) – it includes a range of interviewees (students, musician, media strategist, professional hacker, creative commons representative, recruitment personnel and lawyer). See: budd:e

Students may also gain additional information about strategies for protecting online privacy by checking out 'Privacy' on the 'Guff' section of budd:e Follow up discussion ideas are provided in the ‘Teachers Resources’ section of budd:e

Discussion prompts

  1. What type of information would you or your friends find embarrassing if posted online?
  2. How can we select photographs to be published online which will not compromise our online privacy?
  3. Why should you not reveal information about yourselves (such as address, phone number, school or email address on social networking sites and other similar details)?
  4. Brainstorm strategies to protect your private information and that of your peers.

Students can then test their knowledge in the interactive section of budd:e, 'Live' (although this is probably most useful when students have viewed all the other Toob and Guff sections).

Teaching idea 4: (Years 10-12) My Face (from Triple J’s The Hack Half Hour)

View the episode: My Face: Sophie’s Story

Will you end up regretting what you reveal about yourself online?

‘In this episode of ‘The Hack Half Hour’ we explore why we post so much personal information in blogs, vlogs and on social networking pages and we'll look at what the repercussions and advantages might be for our relationships and career. Will all this information become part of a permanent record? How can it be accessed and used in the future? We hear from Australia's number one YouTube vlogger Natalie Tran (aka community channel), triple j film critic Marc Fennell, a self proclaimed trash-bag from the Gold Coast and even a sneaky hacker and recruitment agents.

At the centre of the MYFACE conversation is 16 year old Sophie. She's got well over 200,000 friends and welcomes just about anyone into her online space. Sophie has dedicated a lot of time to her social networking profile often spending several hours a day working on it. For her it's a creative and emotional outlet as she edits photos and images and writes a blog about her battles with illness and depression (and things that piss her off!). Is there anything she should be concerned about in terms of what she reveals about herself online?’

Discussion prompts

  1. Were you surprised at how information on social networking sites can be used against you by recruiters or by hackers?
  2. What actions could you take to avoid these negative consequences occurring?
  3. What would your advice be to Sophie? Draw up a list of the benefits (that Sophie has, or could, gain from her online life) and the possible disadvantages (that are explored in this program), then consider the advice you would extend to Sophie.
  4. Do you agree with Natalie Tran that people are naïve to think that what they put online won’t be used against them? (List examples from this video or from your own experience, to support your views).
  5. How can we have a social life online without doing harm to ourselves or others? Draw up a list of responsible online behaviours based on what you heard on this TV program.

Teaching idea 5: (Year 9) Transacting and e-security – budd:e

View the video clip on Transacting from the ‘Toob’ section of budd:e – includes a range of interviewees discussing online purchasing (students, musician, professional hacker, creative commons representative and lawyer).

Students may also gain additional information about strategies for protecting online safety when shopping online by checking out ‘Transacting’ from the ‘Guff’ section of budd:e

Follow up discussion ideas are provided in budd:e's: Teachers Resources

Discussion prompts

  1. What types of goods would you or your friends purchase or sell online?
  2. Which sites do you consider to be safe when it comes to online buying, selling or money transfers? How can you judge if a site is secure?
  3. What would you consider to be safe purchasing and selling procedures?

Students can then test their knowledge in the interactive section Live (although this is probably most useful when students have viewed all the other Toob and Guff sections) of budd:e

Teaching idea 6: ThinkUKnow YouTube channel

View: ThinkUKnow Australia's Megan’s Story 

Recent research shows four per cent of teenagers have taken inappropriate photos of themselves. Discuss this with students.

Teaching idea 7: Sexting – the legal and social consequences

See Sexting unit of work – the legal and social consequences on: ACMA Cyber[smart:] – The ACMA Units of Work

This comprehensive unit addresses the following learning outcomes:

  • identifying how sexting incidents occur among teenagers
  • responding critically to sexting issues including how to protect themselves and others
  • critically analysing the potential legal and social consequences of sexting.
 

Protecting my online identity

Focus: My online identity
Objective: To strengthen students’ understanding of strategies they can use to protect their online identity and appropriate action to be taken if their online identity is breached.

Teaching ideas

Teaching idea 1: Managing online safety

See Managing online safety on: ACMA Cyber[smart:] – The ACMA Units of Work

Some elements of this unit are presented below as teaching ideas. The unit however, presents these resources as part of a complete unit of work consisting of 12 activities. As a result of completing the unit students will be able to:

  • list the risks involved with social networking, and detail strategies to better manage those risks
  • acknowledge that it is difficult to remove or retract content once it is posted online
  • recognise that others may use ‘grooming’ strategies to build relationships with young people
  • identify the indicators of grooming behaviour
  • apply strategies to help protect themselves and their peers online.

Teaching idea 2: Stalking Sarah

View the Wise Up To It video: Stalking Sarah 

Complete the accompanying lesson plan.

'Sarah is a pretty active internet user. She’s a regular in chat rooms, often posts info in discussion groups and has visited a heap of websites. She meets some pretty interesting people online as well, people with similar interests…sport, music, movies and stuff like that. So when some guy follows her through cyberspace, she’s pretty freaked out. He emails her, posts comments about her in chat rooms and has somehow found out her mobile phone number.

This clip could be about anyone. Find out what Sarah did to protect herself.'

Teaching idea 3: Amy’s choice

View the NetSmartz video: Amy's choice

Hear the true story of a 15-year-old girl who left home to meet in person with a man she first met online. Accompanying activity cards (suitable for Years 9/10) are available.

Other newspaper stories about similar incidents can be accessed at: Netsmartz's Real Life Stories

Teaching idea 4 (Year 9): Creating – budd:e 

View the budd:e video clip from the 'Toob' section: Creating – includes a range of interviewees on the subject of what we are posting online and what this may reveal about our identity (students, musician, media strategist, professional hacker, creative commons representative and lawyer).

Students may also gain additional information about strategies for protecting their online identity by checking out 'Creating' on the 'Guff' section of budd:e

Discussion prompts

  1. What types of things do you post online about yourself? What image of you do these things present? (Consider MySpace, Facebook, blogging, vlogging)?
  2. What types of things do you post online about your friends? (Consider the tags you put on photographs)
  3. What types of things are posted online by your friends, about you? (Consider the tags they put on photographs). What action would you take if you didn’t like these postings?
  4. Who else might be looking at social networking sites? What could they learn about you from these sites?
  5. Revise strategies to protect your identity (and digital reputation) and that of your peers.

Students can then test their knowledge in the interactive section ‘Live’ of budd:e (although this is probably most useful when students have viewed all the other Toob and Guff sections).

Teaching idea 5: Newspaper articles

Read: 

Discussion prompts

  • What strategies for protecting one’s online identity are provided in these articles?
  • Does it seem like Australian teens are practising these strategies? Why do you think this is the case?
  • What is the best way of encouraging all users of social networking sites to take appropriate precautions to protect their identity?
  • What advice would you give to someone who is planning to use online gaming?
  • What makes a safe chat room? (http://www.chatdanger.com/chat/setup.aspx)
  • Take the Chat Quiz
  • Go to: Getting Too Close
 

Protecting myself and others from cyberbullying

Focus: Cyberbullying
Objective: To strengthen students’ understanding of the impact that cyberbullying can have on people, strategies to avoid getting into or contributing to negative situations online, and legal implications of negative online communications.

Note: The discussion to introduce the topic of cyberbullying should be contextualised within the school’s Student Engagement Policy and the proactive steps to prevent any form of bullying, including cyberbullying.

Teaching ideas

Teaching idea 1: Tagged

When a group of high-school friends post a rumour about a rival it sparks a chain reaction that leaves no one untouched. Cyberbullying, sexting, filmed fights and police action ensue – will these friends avoid being tagged forever?

Developed by the Australian Communications and Media Authority’s Cybersmart program, Tagged is recommended for use with students aged 14 and over.

Tagged is supported by lesson plans and compelling character reflection interviews. It explores themes of personal and peer safety and responsibility that are crucial to maintaining positive online behaviours and digital reputation into adulthood.

See: Tagged

Work through the comprehensive lesson resources at: Tagged: Resources for Schools

Teaching idea 2: Cyberbullying: You can’t take it back

View the NetSmartz video: You Can’t Take It Back

A teen regrets his participation on a web site created to rate girls at his school. He recognises that once you have put something online, you can’t take it back. Raises the issue of online responsibility. Accompanying activity cards (suitable for Years 9/10) can be accessed.

News stories (including tips about what to do if you are subject to cyberbullying) can be accessed at: Netsmartz's Real Life Stories

Teaching idea 3: (Year 9) Truth – budd:e (Also applicable for older students)

View the second section of the video clip on ‘Truth’ from the ‘Toob’ section of budd:e – includes a range of interviewees who discuss the issue of cyberbullying (students, recruitment agent and a lawyer). See: budd:e

Note that the first half of the video clip deals with assessing the reliability of websites – teachers may wish to deal with this issue separately.
Students may also gain additional information about actions to be taken against cyberbullying by checking out ‘Truth’ from the ‘Guff’ section of budd:e

Discussion prompts

  1. If you feel uncomfortable with messages or images you are receiving online, what should you do?
  2. Compare your ideas with tips found at: Cyber[smart:] Teens' Cyberbullying
  3. How is cyberbullying the same as other forms of bullying? How is it different?
  4. What does defamation mean? What strategies can you take to avoid defamation of others? What should you do if you believe you are being defamed online?

Students can then test their knowledge in the interactive section ‘Live’ of budd:e (although this is probably most useful when students have viewed all the other Toob and Guff sections).

Teaching idea 4: Student action

In 2011, Year 9 students from selected schools took part in the Digital Demons Project. This project empowered students to take action against cyberbullying by researching, planning and acting at a local level. Use the following resources hosted in the FUSE portal to develop a school-based student action project similar to that of Digital Demons. The ‘client’ could be a local community group, sporting organisation or buiness.